Microbiome and Germ-Free INSIGHTS


Depression and the Microbiome

New research is regularly being published on the connection between the gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) — together known as the gut-brain axis. Alterations in the composition of intestinal microbiota have also been associated with antibiotic use and the progression of infectious diseases. Historically, we have reported on the link between Parkinson's disease and the microbiome, how high salt diets may alter the microbiome,...

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Rederivation of Mouse Models at Higher Health Statuses

Rederiving murine research models is the process of transferring embryos from one animal into another which is either germ-free or hosts only specifically identified microbiota. This "resets" the health status of the line, allowing the offspring of mice or rats that were previously infected with either viruses, parasites, or bacteria to be used in research studies. This article will review the process of rederiving a mouse line...

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Bacteria Making Headlines in 2018

In the last few months, multiple bacterial species have been making headlines. This review will outline three types of bacteria and how specific strains may prevent or encourage the development of bacterial infections. I) Escherichia coli (E. coli) The strain that is undoubtedly the most familiar to the general public is E. coli. Once again, romaine lettuce has been abandoned by supermarkets and restaurants as per advice...

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2019 Microbiome Conferences

Looking for a microbiome conference or workshop? Here are some upcoming sessions we'll be following with interest. 2019 Microbiome Conferences: More Specific as Field Matures The Translational Microbiome Research Forum (TMRF) lists thirty-six 2019 conferences so far, and updates their Events page upon announcement of new meetings. While the majority (72%) of microbiome conferences in 2018 were of general interest, 2019 events are much more focused on...

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Seasonal Cycling in the Gut Microbiome of the Hadza Hunter-gatherers of Tanzania

Researchers from Stanford University published a paper in Science titled "Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania" which examines the relationship between diet, seasons, and the microbiome. The authors performed a longitudinal study on 350 stool samples collected throughout a year and a half and found that the microbial population in these samples changed in composition from wet to dry seasons as...

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Nature Biotechnology Publication: Translating microbiome futures

Figure 1: Over the past five years, the scientific output in the microbiome field and the number of microbiome-related published patents has been steadily rising. Sources: PubMed (search terms "human microbiome" and "human microbiota"); Fankhauser et al.; University of Chicago Technology Commercialization; CBInsights; CrunchBase; GlobalData; the companies. The publication of Translating microbiome futures is the culmination of more than a year's work by Gaspar Taroncher-Oldenberg, Consultant in...

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Webinar Q&A — Cyclical Bias

In a recent webinar, Dr. Alex Rodriguez-Palacios of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine discussed a confounding influence on many common microbiome study endpoints uncovered in studies using the NesTiso system. The NesTiso system has been described in a previous publication1 and examined in an on-demand webinar. Due to time constraints, some of the questions you submitted to our Q&A session went unanswered. We present here...

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Humanizing the gut microbiota of mice: Opportunities and challenges

On August 8, 2018, Randi Lundberg, DVM, PhD published a review paper titled, Humanizing the gut microbiota of mice: Opportunities and challenges in the journal, Laboratory Animals. The author acknowledges the need for in vivo models to study the human microbiome's interaction with a biologically relevant host. Mice are one of the most popular animal models used in biomedical research and have been adopted as one of...

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Webinar Q&A — Nested Isolation

In a recent webinar, Dr. Alex Rodriguez-Palacios of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine discussed the use of a new, low-cost caging system for conducting microbiome research in rodents. The speaker shared their experience with the NesTiso system and discussed: How NesTiso makes gnotobiotic research simple and practical How to inexpensively verify the germ-free status of your models How the portability of NesTiso systems accelerate gnotobiotic...

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Book Review: Animal Models for Microbiome Research

This book is the outcome of Workshop on Animal Models for Microbiome Research: Advancing Basic Science and Translational Research, hosted by the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR). Microbiome and germ-free researchers James Fox, Joseph Newsome, Wendy Garrett, Jeffrey Gordon and Vincent Young organized the workshop, with the following goals: Improve the depth and breadth of analysis of microbial communities using various model organisms Address the challenges...

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